Tag Archives: Elena

2015: Waiting to get off the roller coaster…

2015 had its highs and lows. Unfortunately the low spots were way lower than the highs were high.

For the lows, I lost two students in June and had two more suffer significant injuries. Then this month I lost my new grandson, Nolan Luther. You can read my posts about these here. Scroll through the few personal blog posts that I wrote this year. The two most significant start with the word Sad.

It is through this haze of sadness that I write today. Because that’s what I do. Working through my grief, building shelves, cooking food for family and writing. I don’t have it in me to write fiction and I’ve wrote most of what I can for now. I’ll finish with some of the things that went right in 2015.

A stand-alone parallelequel to ALL IS SILENCE.
A stand-alone parallelequel to ALL IS SILENCE.

My birthday, February 15th, marked twenty years as an professional educator. I released the first o f two books: The short Deserted Lands novel, TOILS AND SNARES, on my oldest brother’s birthday, February 28th.

Following the sad end of the school year, Elena and I took my youngest son, Ian to Italy for his high school trip, a tradition started by my parents with all his older siblings and cousins. We saw great art, opera, a street cellist, and many wonderful places: Rome, Florence, Venice, Verona and the foothills of the Dolomites. Other than intense heat, some allergies for Ian and my phone left behind in Vancouver, B.C., the trip was splendid.

After sending Ian to England for some time with his mom, aunt and grandmother (and a lot more chilly weather) Elena and I headed to Torino to visit her cousin. We loved Torino, the museums, the lower heat and the food. Then we headed south through Genoa to Cinque Terra for a night and then back to Rome and home.

At home, I headed to the finish line to STRAIGHT INTO DARKNESS, the sequel to my debut novel ALL IS SILENCE. I was pushing hard, but it was going hard. My deadline was a release party at Village Books on August 28th. I went to Worldcon, the Science Fiction and Fantasy convention, in Spokane. We arrived to an apocalyptic red sun from all the forest fires. I spent most of my time in the room trying to finish book II. But, alas, my computer died. The fan stopped working and I could not even get it to start for long enough to back up. My backups to the cloud had inexplicably stopped a few days before we left for Spokane. I took the last day to see people. Greg Bear remembering me was the highlight. He accepted a personally inscribed copy of my debut novel, and signed a copy of his new novel, WAR DOGS.

I came back to Bellingham, we managed to print 25 Advanced Reader Copies for the release party, which was well attended, and sold quite a few books, a shirt and some download cards for Village Books and me. I spent that next week before school started turning out a better copy and printed 25 more copies. After I printed the next 25 I realized there was no identifying that STRAIGHT INTO DARKNESS was Book II. So if you have a copy of it that doesn’t say Book II, you have one of the first 75 printed! Hopefully, that will mean something someday.

Our school year started really well, despite a bunch of changes in staffing and less students than we had hoped–a building year in both senses. Part of my building has been working with another wonderful student teacher who has become a friend and a writing critique partner, Tegan Shelton. You can check out her first book here.

Having such a capable student teacher enabled me to begin building a school library. With two student book drives and a bunch of help from the last years worth of TAs, and Ro, a Windward parent and librarian at Whatcom Community College, it is coming together.

Then third quarter started at the end of November 30th, (a date that marks six years together with Elena! Yeah!) and I am teaching English 11/12, Drama AND Spanish I (for the third time in 20 years.) I have found myself challenged and overwhelmed, but exciting to be teaching again.

The year has ended not well, but with another outpouring of love. Please keep my family in your thoughts in the days ahead. Pay it forward with some Random Acts of Kindness, please.

Wishing you a Happy New Year and much peace and joy.

rob-sign-Trans-blue

 

February, a 28 day Slater…

My 48th birthday was February 15th. I feel very blessed this month, a year after releasing my first novel. Hoping that saying something out loud doesn’t ruin it… I have sold a piece of writing for everyday of this month. Yes. 28 sales. Split between pre-sales on Toils and Snares, All Is Silence in print and in all three major e-book markets, two copies of Just Desert and one copy of the Outward Bound Collection. That doesn’t come close to matching the first few months All Is Silence the first few months after release, but sales had fallen significantly after the summerMy total for January was 14. December was about half of that.

Funny thing is there has been no significant up-tick. Has all the promotion I have been doing for the past 18 months finally started to pay off? Am I reaching critical mass? I could learn to live with this steadiness, especially considering I will have a new novella out the day after tomorrow and a new short story in March on Kindle format: Another Kind of Ignorance. Planning on releasing a short story a month until Straight Into Darkness comes out this summer.

A few of those sales can be attributed to my activity on Wattpad. Tonight I hit 400,000 reads, Over 62,000 people have sampled my novel. Several thousand are working their way through it serially with a fairly passionate core of about 1000 readers who makes comments, complaints and compliments. Not coincidentally, if the trend continues, I will have 1000 Followers on Wattpad by March 1st.

I started uploading the first draft of Toils and Snares to Wattpad in early December. I uploaded the first four chapters in two parts each over 8 weeks. Then, I updated it with the second draft. Tonight I finished uploading the final draft and have Chapter 5 — Part I, the last section I will upload for free. It would be interesting to know how many of the folks who read All Is Silence and/or Toils and Snares on Wattpad purchase Toils and Snares on Amazon. I wish I had a good way to track those numbers.

Thanks so much to all the folks who gave me feedback on Toils & Snares, especially, Elena, Donald, Jesikah, Amanda, Dave, Peter, Katie, Nichole, Pam, Shann, Kole, and my Mom & Dad. I’m afraid the one thing I forgot in the pre-sale upload was an acknowledgement and thanks page. So, once it goes live, I will update that to reflect the support of you wonderful people. Since I will need to do an update anyway, I would love to hear about any typos anyone may find in the story.

Next week I will start revealing some of the rough drafts of cover art for Straight Into Darkness. I will say the cover, designed by Pintado, the same artist behind All Is Silence has created another awesome cover that captures the bleaker, colder feelings. Let’s just say it’s a little blue.

Thanks for coming along for the ride. I hope you’ll follow me Straight Into Darkness. I promise there will be a light at the end of the tunnel that is not an oncoming train.

Things more important than words…

Things more important than words and streaks and novels and such. And the greatest of these are family and friends. Yesterday I focused on them. I got up early and continued ripping out old decking so that it would be safe for small children to play on. Safe is, of course, a relative term. I wouldn’t recommend anyone go barefoot on the ground I cleared. I think I picked up all the nails and brackets that I removed, but I also picked up several rusty nails from the previous deck installation.

I spent the morning alternating between tearing out decking in the sun to tacking in baseboards and flooring transitions, cleaning and reframing posters, making spinach dip, this time know as seaweed dip for the first grandchild’s first birthday and in general helping my partner, Elena, ready her house for an onslaught of family and friends. The day was lovely, but hot. The work was arduous, but utterly worthwhile. But it wasn’t until I sat down, I think for the second time during the day, to show my mom how to create a blog post that I wrote any words. And that was incidental rather than intentional. Do I begrudge this day? NO! Absolutely not.

I wrote TWENTY-SIX [26] new words yesterday, so I guess I can continue my streak of toils&snares3writing days at 47. But I definitely lost the streak of 500+ word days at 34 days. 34 days was a much longer streak than the previous 11 day streak, so progress is being made. Lots of progress, in fact. I’m still, despite two days under 500 words, averaging 654.40 per day! I’m a third of the way to my 182,500 word goal for 2014. I am 90% complete on my Deserted Lands novella:Toils and Snares. I am nearly 2/3 done with the first draft of Straight Into Darkness. So, today, I reboot to the head my goal of writing 500+ words a day. I intend to reboot it with a vengeance starting with this blog post. [338 and counting.]

My goals this week with Elena at work are to hit NANOWRIMO levels–1667+ words per day. But there are still family and friends to see and to hang out with. School rooms, bedrooms, cars and decks to clean. Food to make and store and plan for. Books to market, stories to edit, kickstarters to get started and things to mail. So, as we head into August, wish me luck. Actually, wish me hard work. That’s where the luck comes from.

Write on,

Rob

My Path to Indie Publication: Part X—Finding Equilibrium

Path to Indie Publication Series is a companion series to Marshall Ryan Maresca’s Path to Publication. I have been avidly reading Marshall’s posts since I discovered his blog. Read Path to Indie PublicationPart IPart IIPart III. Part IV. Part V. Part VIPart VII. Part VIIIPart IX

Part X—Finding Equilibrium: the agony and the ecstasy of new authorhood. *

With the success of the three readings equaling sales of more than 70 books, I was very hyped about attending Norwescon 37. I created and ordered bookmarks—5000 for about $200 including shipping. They had special pricing codes: $3 off either a signed print book or a Kobo eBook as well as a note to find me on social media and I’d meet them at the con and sell them a signed copy for a great deal without the shipping and handling. Elena and I went down to the stuffing party to help put 3500 of my bookmarks into the swag bags. The result? [Because, I’m following Kris Rusch’s rule of not offering a deal unless you can track whether it is successful or not.] Nada. Zip. Zilch. The only book I sold was one that was already promised months before to a beta reader. She bought a second book, because I didn’t have change! Sheesh.

The best thing to happen at Norwescon was that I got to see Gordon Van Gelder, he had seen somewhere, a bookmark maybe, that I had a book coming out. He asked if I’d send him a review copy, which of course I was happy to do as I could then send him one of the new and rare copies with the Dante Rossetti Award announced on the cover. Will it lead to a review in the Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction? Who knows. But , alas, if this one doesn’t break with him, perhaps the next one will.

I still have about 1500 bookmarks and will be taking many of them to ALA14 to see if anything happens this time around. I also gave out a couple handfuls at Vikingcon in Bellingham with no discernible sales off site. I think bookmarks are cool, but don’t spend $200 and expect to get it back. I actually prefer the postcards that I made in cover-shaped format, a better way to get the name and the graphic out there. 

Vikingcon was really awesome. I met a bunch of cool people, and renewed my acquaintance with Greg and Astrid Bear. I met Greg at a Vikingcon in the 1990s and then got to be on a panel about Robert Heinlein with him in 2005 at Norwescon. So, I got to hang out with Greg Bear, I got a free table in the conference hall to sell my books and I got to meet really cool people. I am a fairly terminal optimist, so I signed 10 books with my name and inscribed Vikingcon 2014! But none sold before the panel with Greg. The panel on technology in SF, “Text me, Scotty.” went well. After the panel, my daughter Sheridan, womanning the booth with her daughter and younger sister, had sold two copies. A few people who had attended the panel came by and bought books. Then the Vikingcon folks came to pick up the signed copy I’d promised them. And as the Vendor’s hall was closing I sold the last of the 10 books. Maybe next time I should pre-inscribe 50? Nah. Lesson learned.

The biggest bump of sales not related to meeting people directly came from a friendly source. Dean Kahn, the Bellingham Herald editor who had guided the Serial Science Fiction story Memories of Light the previous year asked his readers to nominate the best books set in Bellingham. Four fans [also friends] wrote in praising my book. The day it came out I sold 9 ebooks and 2 print books in the next 24 hours and several more over the next few days. Yeah!

I’m currently sending out some short fiction set in the same universe to magazine editors in the hopes that a story might lead people to the novel. I’m also planning to release a standalone Deserted Lands novella, Toils and Snares, in the fall as an ebook. As I write this sales have gone flat, but they’ve already been better than I expected. I’ve got more readings set up and a trip to Las Vegas for the American Library Association convention followed by a drive up to Provo where the next book, Straight Into Darkness takes place.

The long awaited hardcover of All Is Silence will be here soon as will summer with more time to write. I’m doing a PubSlush campaign so I can pay my editors and cover artists more. The benefits will be commensurate with the crowd-funding amounts. More to come after school comes out.

Thanks for coming along for the ride. It’s been a roller coaster for me, but as this ride continues, I feel more and more certain that choosing the Indie Publishing route was absolutely the right decision for me. As I have more insight into this amazing process, I’ll blog a bit more, but for now… I’ve gotta write on…

* Adapted and expanded from the Foreword to Outward Bound: Science Fiction & Poetry, a collection of some of my published and unpublished works. Top

My Path to Indie Publication: Part IX– Party On.

Path to Indie Publication Series is a companion series to Marshall Ryan Maresca’s Path to Publication. I have been avidly reading Marshall’s posts since I discovered his blog. Read Path to Indie PublicationPart IPart IIPart III. Part IV. Part V. Part VIPart VII. Part VIII

Party On.*

One of the ideas I had picked up from Mary Robinett Kowal’s Debut Author lessons, an excellent and concise primer for how to act pro as a newbie author, was that I needed professional author photos. I had been crossing paths for several years with Damian Vines, an acquaintance from my Grays Harbor wannabe rocker years. We played some guitar, exchanged Facebook posts and I marveled at his growing body of fine art photography. When it came time, we agreed that the grounds of the old Northern State mental hospital grounds in Sedro Woolley would be perfect for some apocalyptic shots. The day was cold, but we got some great photos

Then during a chance conversation at Village Books with Paul Hansen, store manager, he suggested I have the Release Party at Village Books. I had been thinking of other venues around town, churches, former churches, even Windward High School where I teach. But what better place to do a release party? I wanted to do it almost immediately, this was the second week of February and I wanted to do it on the 20th of February, but Christina at VB events convinced me to put it out a month so we could get the word out.

Elena, my partner, and Amanda, my editor, gave me advice to improve on the reading I had done at AWP in Seattle. I cut down the one section I had read, leaving it on a cliffhanger and chose another short one that I also hoped would leave the listeners wanting more. I put up a Facebook event, a Google+ event, posted it on my blog, my newsletter, Goodreads and my Amazon author page. I invited 500 of my various followers who might be within driving distance. When the day came, 50 people had RSVP’d they would be there. I created a powerpoint to run before the event started, I rehearsed to songs I’d written that I thought seemed to fit thematically. I ordered pizza and Mountain Dew, food for the Apocalypse, as well as cookies, tea and coffee for those wanting a kinder, gentler end of the world.

I printed up cards for a free giveaway of my short fiction and poetry collection. Each card was numbered so I could not only see how many folks attended, but also do drawings for door-prizes:robslater a copy of Some of the Parts, my CD of original music, and a copy of Blue Deer: Four Generations of Poetry, my mom’s poetry book which includes poems by her father, me and some of my kids. Everything was going well, albeit a little harried. Parking near Village Books was practically non-existent. I parked in a no parking zone to unload boxes of books, guitar and other stuff. And then realized that I only had my school computer which did not have the VGA connector to hook up the presentation. Oops.

I played an extra song while folks were continuing to stream in and then started the show about five minutes late, but with most of the chairs filled. We ended up with at least 75 people as I gave out all 75 cards I had printed. We had a nice break midway through and most of the pizza and all of the cookies disappeared. After each of the readings I fielded questions including my favorite, “How old should you be to read this book?” I suggested that anyone under 15 probably should check it out with parents first. We sold 24 books and had a lovely, lovely evening ending in drinks with friends across the green at the Archer Ale House.

I followed the release party up with a Hometown Reading the first weekend of my spring break. [Immortalized in this Seussian poem] The reading took place at the Hoquiam Timberland Regional Library, a home away from home when I was growing up and the place where some forward thinking librarian got me hooked on Science Fiction. We did essentially the same format as the release party minus the pizza. This time we got the projector up and running the presentation. The crowd was smaller, and many called me, “Robbie,” as they’d known me since childhood. We sold a few more books, had a pleasant weekend of thrift store shopping and ate at two of my favorite restaurant meals: Casa Mia Pizza’s Special and The Canton’s Egg rolls. I brought extra servings of both back home to Bellingham, after doing a reading at Harbor High School in Aberdeen. I also left copies for the other two local high school libraries and fundraisers. Not long after getting home with the food, my high school buddy, Derek Cook, principal of Harbor High contacted me to buy a classroom set of 30!

I realized the price I had quoted, once shipped would be nearly at cost. Thankfully, I managed to send them south with my niece, another former Grays Harborite, saving the shipping cost of 30 pounds of books.

Next Week: Part X—Finding Equilibrium, the agony and the ecstasy of new authorhood. Where our author goes to conventions and finds success and failure.

Write on…

* Adapted and expanded from the Foreword to Outward Bound: Science Fiction & Poetry, a collection of some of my published and unpublished works. Top

My Path to Indie Publication: Part VII–The Harder I Work the Luckier I Get

My Path to Indie Publication Series is a companion series to Marshall Ryan Maresca’s Path to Publication. I have been avidly reading Marshall’s posts since I discovered his blog. Read Path to Indie PublicationPart IPart IIPart III. Part IV. Part V.  Part VI. 

The Harder I Work the Luckier I Get *

The Harder I work the Luckier I get. I know this quote has been said many times and many ways for many years. But I heard it first from one of the hardest working authors out there, Kevin Anderson. I don’t know if I heard him say this or if I heard it from Kris and Dean or someone else, but the thought stuck. I didn’t always pull it off, but I kept it as a goal. How does an artist get successful? By putting their work and their ‘self’ out for public consumption.

At the end of November I was stressed. I had only hit about 35,000 words for NANOWRIMO 2013 – Straight into Darkness, compared to the nearly 60,000 the year before. I wanted to get the pre-release copies of the novel out before the Holidays, but I had only finished the “last” draft, post-ARC, version 8.0 of All Is Silence at the end of October. This and Scrivener’s learning curve for print production, much more challenging than e-book, took the air out of my sales a couple times.

All Is Silence went out to the copy-editors after edits from me based on Advanced Reader Copies [ARCs] feedback. Five chapters at a time, a few days apart. 12/12, 12/15-19 5 chapter each day, then 12/24 and finally 12/28. I rewrote the ending chapter after significant advice from my partner, Elena.

I pushed through winter break editing and formatting, still hoping to release the e-book on January 1st. My vacation from school was anything but. While all this was going on I couldn’t stop the marketing piece. I ran two GoodReads giveaways over Thanksgiving and the winter holidays. I blogged some. I built my Twitter following, Facebook, Google+ and newsletter lists. Christopher Key, a reviewer I’d known through my Shakespeare and theatre connections, agreed to review All Is Silence for the Entertainment News NorthWest, January edition. It was a stellar review noting Lizzie’s anti-hero. It came out on the 4th with a mention on the cover and then on the 7th of January All Is Silence went live to the world on two of the three major ebooksellers as I worked on finishing the formatting for print version.

Due to accidentally hitting the unpublish button on Kobo, I had trouble getting All Is Silence onto that market. I’d tried to republish and was waiting on a 72 hour process that took over a week. I was also fighting with ebook formatting wanting to keep my text in the fonts I had chosen for print. Baskerville for most of the text, but Arial Narrow Bold for the e-mails and texting between the characters. Then, a most auspicious e-mail arrive. Sam Kass, of Village Books, wanted to know if I was interested in a workshop with Kobo about their Self-Publishing site: Kobo Writing Life. I was frustrated by Kobo support’s lack of responsiveness on my issue {though I had not tried phone support [since phone calls are actually my Kryptonite. (I later used their phone support and received more immediate information.)]}.  Sam connected me with Mark Lefebvre, director of Kobo’s Self-Publishing and Author Relations [And an author himself under the name Mark Leslie]. He graciously helped me through my issues and even bought the first Kobo copy of All Is Silence when the narrative hooked him.

#3 with a bulletWe did the workshop. I learned a lot and gave pretty good advice, I think. Kobo ran a promotion for the book and lo and behold, the next day I was #7 on Kobo’s U.S. Young Adult Science Fiction chart. It went as high as #3, surrounded by Veronica Roth’s Divergent Universe books (Allegiant was the next book and her short stories filled many of the next rows). My story with Kobo was only beginning as I readied for the February 18th release date.

I wrapped up another GoodReads Giveaway at the end of January and was disappointed with the results, but to counter that was the good news that All Is Silence had been named a Finalist in the Dante Rossetti YA contest.

Next Week: Part VIII–Print Release, Awards and Readings.

* Adapted and expanded from the Foreword to Outward Bound: Science Fiction & Poetry, a collection of some of my published and unpublished works. Top

Oh, the Places I went on my Spring Break

A poem by Robert L. Slater, inspired by Theodore Geisel

In the spring of the year of twenty fourteen
There was found a kind author with a penchant for green
He printed his novels on backs of DOOSpaper*
And tried to recycle all of the newspaper

When to his hometown he returned for a read
His welcome surprised him, too true, yes, indeed
Old friends and family called him all Robbie
And they sat and they talked in the library lobby

After the show, many books he did sell
Then off to the pizza place still feeling swell
He met with his editors, partner and friends
And they talked and he bubbled all over again

Then back to the motel, dingy and old
To wait till the sun came to check for the mold
The innkeeper was sorry, but not sorry enough
To give any discount, oh, boy that was tough.

The next day was better, a run on the beach
And a trip to the bookstore not far out of reach
The bookstore was closed on the Sunday and Mon
So back to the drawing board where he’d begun

He found a drugstore that sold books, drugs and gifts
The fact that they knew him gave him quite the lift
They took six new books to sell to more people
Then off Robbie went avoiding the Fleepell**

He went to a high school, to students he read
Though loving of Zombies, none were undead
They paid good attention and asked many queries
Till after an hour the author was weary

He headed north and did battle with Seattle traffic
But good news awaited at home, wait a tick,
The school wanted 30 new books signed right quick

He quoted a price that would fleece his accounts
Then hoped he could send the books south on a bounce
An ex-wife said no, I am already here
But a cousin, a niece said, “I’m going, no fear.”

So the author, our friend, settled in to do flooring
Replacing old fake wood with tile’s not boring
But hard work it was and tired he got
So watched he Star Wars movies with his youngest daught-
er or something like that.

The second Star Wars that was numbered Part Five
Was really refreshing for those still alive
A swim at the YMCA was quite cool
But, boy, was tired when he crawled from the pool

He mowed the high lawn ‘fore rain started to fall
[And yes, I know this bad grammar is all]
The spring break did end with a film that was Bella
And then some more pizza—what a happy fella

When he got back to school he found students galore
Awaiting to tell him ’bout the week gone before
So Kevin and Gabe did not know what to do
So they sat and made fun of Rob’s writing too

* D.O.O.S.paper is Dirty On One Side or the paper formerly known as scratch paper.
** I had to make up at least one proper noun!
Top

Coming Home: What is a moment when it’s gone…

My first reading as a published novelist in the library where I discovered science fiction went very well. I had old and new friends, family and, hopefully, some new fans. We had 30+ people, I sold 17 books and had plenty of hugs and fond remembrances and fond farewells with future meetings hoped for.

I ended the evening at Casa Mia with my parents and my partner, Elena. The pizza was excellent and not quite what I remember, but the salad was exactly the same. I also ran into three other Harbor folks I knew. The place was hopping. Good to see continued success.

Today, I was shopping for little stands to display the books and a young woman came up to me and said, “You’re that book guy. I remember your face from the paper!” She’s a senior at Hoquiam High School, my alma mater. Totally surreal. I gave her a card with the cover art and told her the book should be available in the school library soon.

A run on the beach and some bird watching rounded out a day that alternated between sunshine and rain. Then we went to the Canton restaurant in Aberdeen for the “should be world famous” egg rolls. Amazing still. When I found out they would be closed tomorrow I asked for an extra order to go.

Tomorrow I’ll be talking with students at Harbor High, an alternative school in Aberdeen blocks from where I used to live, in a building where my mom used to teach parenting classes.

This weekend I felt warmth and gratitude for the things that have remained, some sadness for things that have changed and people we have lost.  Though the words I sang in the song I wrote say, “You cannot pass the rainbow and you cannot go back home…” This weekend I got partway back home. Far enough.

Cheers.

Debuts of another sort.

Secret’s out. I’ve got my new glasses on. My hands look wrinkly. “Jes call me, grampa.” Poppy actually. Sitting here with Nonna Elena. Toasting the new babe with dark chocolate and a Syrah.

Sheridan M. Musick Slater and Cameron Caya had a baby girl, my first grand-kid: Elliot Marie. 8 lbs. 19.5 inches.

Not a lot of sleep last night, but I did sleep on three chairs pulled into a “couch” and my 9 year old’s purple pillow pet.

 

Two New Deserted Lands Stories? Done. Mostly.

Well, not totally done. Finished the first drafts of two new Deserted Lands stories while riding to Vancouver, B.C. for a significant other’s birthday.

Great walk at the Reifel Bird Sanctuary and then lunch at East is East. Great Indian food, lovely atmosphere. It’s 9 pm and I’m writing this blog post. I haven’t eaten since 3:30 and I’m still not hungry!

As for the stories. First reader Elena says… “Uh, is that a story?” for the first one. And for the second? “Ew. Yes. It’s a story. And it’s disturbing.” So, I figure, 50% isn’t bad. It would be great if I was playing baseball.

Now to reread and see if I can figure out what I lost in translation. The short story lacking the story line exists somewhere in a notebook I can’t currently find. I thought that REwriting it would magically make the notebook reappear. So far? No good. Well, as soon as this one is a story I’m releasing my ebook short story collection. So, I guess I better just go fix it.

Write on,
Rob